Mathematical Logic Course - FAQ Contents


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Why should my child study Mathematical Logic?

Cognitive research shows that young children develop an extensive everyday mathematical logic base and are capable of learning more and deeper mathematical logic than usually assumed. The content of mathematical logic for young children is wide-ranging (number and operations, shape, space, measurement and pattern) and sometimes abstract. It involves processes of thinking as well as skills and rote memory. Components of early childhood mathematical logic education range from play to organized curriculum. Young children thus are constantly learning new skills and mastering new materials. Acquiring new abilities is a vital part of growing up and entering adulthood. Mathematical logic is one of the most elementary of such skills. Knowledge of math and logic at a young age can help prepare students for many different fields of education and even teach them an entirely new way to think.


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Does preparation in Math Logic problems contribute towards Gifted and Talented selection process?

Yes -- Most Gifted and Talented selection programs focus on mathematical logic problems such as -- analogies, matrix logic, table logic, circle logic, syllogisms, and Venn Diagrams. Our workshops introduce students to each type of problem, then lead them through the process of understanding and solving problems in the class. The students are encouraged to make up their own logic problems to try on relatives and friends. Using inductive and deductive reasoning, students examine data, looking for possible patterns, reasonable solutions, possible inferences, and possible conclusions. The analytical skills learned are necessary for success across the Gifted and Talented selection curriculum.


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What are some common Myths about Gifted students and what are the Truths?

Common Myths About Gifted Students.

Truths About Gifted Students. Adapted from College Planning for Gifted Students, 2nd edition, by Sandra Berger.


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How does participation in Math Olympiads help eventually towards college admissions?

Extracurricular activities such as participation in Math Olympiads are almost as important as your grades themselves. Colleges increasingly want to see your personality. They want to see that not only are you smart enough to survive, but you are a great fit to thrive there, to learn immensely but to also have fun. Everything from your math and science research to your national awards in creative writing would make you stand out as a candidate. We are not trying to say that grades aren't important -- no amount of participation/winning extracurricular competitions are going to rescue you from a 1.75 GPA and a 1200 SAT score. But the converse is true too; extracurricular competitions such as Math Olympiads are playing an increasingly huge rule in application decisions. Extracurricular activities should be things you do for yourself because good schools want to see not just that you participated, but also that you really care about the things you spend your time doing.


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Do you teach basic Math Concepts like addition, subtraction, division and multiplication?

The Mathematical Logic workshops is not intended as a primary learning vehicle for basic Math Concepts like addition, subtraction, division and multiplication. Our main emphasis will be on areas such as Arithmetic word problems (including percent, ratio, and proportion), properties of integers (even, odd, prime numbers, divisibility, etc.), Sets (union, intersection, elements), Counting techniques and Sequences and series.


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Will the Math Logic problems tackled in the workshops be merely numerical in nature?

Mathematical-Logical Intelligence is the ability to think conceptually and abstractly, and capacity to discern logical or numerical patterns. Visual-Spatial Intelligence on the other hand is the capacity to think in images and pictures, to visualize accurately and abstractly. Complex logical nonnumerical problems often arise more frequently than do problems of a numerical nature. Our Math Logic workshops will focus on solving nonnumeric as well as numeric problems as long as they employ logic and analysis.


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What is the Olympiad/competition in focus for the current workshops?

For the current workshops we are focusing both on the AMC 8 and on the Math Kangaroo. For more than 60 years, students across the country have taken up the challenge of America ís longest-running and most prestigious math contests, The American Mathematics Competitions (AMC). The AMC 8 is designed for middle school students in eighth grade and below. Math Kangaroo in USA is a popular international not-selective competition in mathematics for students in grades 1 through 12. The competition takes the form of a multiple choice test. Each participant is seen as a winner and receives recognition and gifts on test day.


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What other Olympiads do you provide coaching for and would potentially have additional courses/workshops on?

Elementary through high-school students participate in one or more of the following Math competitions. The list provided here is purely for the awareness of the parents and is by no means exhaustive. We also wish to clarify here that the Mathematical Logic workshops are not affiliated with nor endorsed by any of the following :


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Will such workshops be conducted again later in the year?

There is a good likelihood that this course will be conducted periodically. Please add your name to our distribution list so that we can keep you informed.


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Where will this Mathematical Logic Workshops be held?

The Mathematical Logic Workshops will be held in Ashburn, VA. The exact location and dates/times will be provided in advance to those who register. If you have any more questions or queries please Contact us.


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What is the registration fee structure?

Registration fees and schedule details for different courses are here.


We wish see you at upcoming Mathematical Logic Workshops!!! Please add yourself to the advance notification list by filling out details on the Contact Us page.